2 Meter Introduction

NATIONAL TRAFFIC SYSTEM (NTS)

(PART ONE)

The National Traffic System is designed to meet two principal objectives: rapid movement of traffic from origin to destination, and training amateur operators to handle written traffic and participate in directed nets. NTS operates daily, and consists of four different net levels; Area, Region, Section, and Local which operate in an orderly time sequence to effect a definite flow pattern for traffic from origin to destination.

Local Nets:

Local nets are those which cover small areas such as a community, city, county or metropolitan area, not a complete ARRL section. They usually operate at VHF 2-meter FM at times and on days most convenient to their members. Some are designated as emergency ARES nets that do not specialize in traffic handling. Local nets are intended mainly for local delivery of traffic. Most local nets and even some section nets in smaller sections are using repeaters to excellent effect. Average coverage on VHF can be extended tenfold or more using a strategically located repeater and this can achieve a local coverage area wide enough to encompass many of the smaller sections.

Section Nets:

Coverage of the section may be accomplished either by individual stations reporting in, by representatives of NTS local nets or both. The purpose of the section net is to handle intra-section traffic, distribute traffic coming down from higher NTS echelons, and put inter-section traffic in the hands of the amateur designated to report into the next-higher NTS region echelon.

 

Operation during Disasters:

When a disaster situation arises, NTS is capable of expanding its cyclic operation into complete or partial operation as needed. ECs in disaster areas determine the communications needs and make decisions regarding the disposition of local communications facilities, in coordination with agencies to be served.

The SEC, after conferring with the affected DECs and ECs, makes his recommendations to the Section Traffic Manager and/or NTS net managers at section and/or region levels. The decision and resulting action to alert the NTS region management may be performed by any combination of these officials, depending upon the urgency of the situation. While the EC is, in effect, the manager of ARES nets operating at local levels, and therefore makes decisions regarding their activation, managers of NTS nets at local, section, region and area levels are directly responsible for activation of their nets in a disaster situation, at the behest of and on the recommendation of ARES or NTS officials at lower levels.

 

TYPES OF EMERGENCY NETS:

Open and Closed Nets: A net may operate as an Open or “free form” net, or as a closed net where a net control station is used to control the flow of transmissions on the channel.

Typically, when the amount of traffic is low or sporadic a net control isn’t required, and an Open net is used. Stations merely listen before they transmit. When a net is declared a “closed” net, then all transmissions must be directed by the NCS.

The following are all closed or directed NETS unless you are specifically told otherwise:

Message Net:

Pulaski countywide net’s function is to carry traffic between cities and other jurisdictions to the County EOC, and/or the Local Red Cross chapter or one of the Hospitals.

Command Net:

This Net’s function is to provide an intercom for County ARES/RACES Staff, ARRL Section Staff, City ECs, and other Agency Supervisors. No formal traffic is to be passed on this net. This net also serves Staff, ECs, and Agency Supervisors when enroute from one location to another.

Tactical Nets:

These other nets are created on an as-required basis to handle ARES/RACES operations within a city or other jurisdictions. They may also be created by other agencies, such as the Red Cross, Hospitals, etc; to handle specific kinds of traffic. Tactical Net names are given by the creating jurisdictions or agency. Tactical Net Control from the jurisdiction’s or agency’s EOC. Tactical Nets will not normally be monitored by the County EOC nor by the Red Cross Chapters (except Tactical Nets created by the Red Cross).

 

INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM: The Incident Command System (ICS) is a management tool that is rapidly being adopted by professional emergency responders throughout the country. ICS provides a coordinated system of command, communications, organization, and accountability in managing emergency events.

Due to the wide spread use of ICS, Amateur Radio operators should be familiar with the system, as well as how they will interface with agencies employing ICS. Integral to the ICS is the concept of Unified Command. There is only one boss, the Incident Commander, who is responsible for the overall operation. For any incident, there are a number of functions that must be performed ranging from planning and logistics to handling the press. The functional requirements of planning, logistics, operations, and finance are always present despite the size of the incident.

They may be handled by a single individual for a small incident, or a “Command Staff” in a large incident. Another characteristic of ICS is “span of control.” In simple terms, any manager should only directly manage a small number of people. ICS uses the number of five for organizational purposes. The number five isn’t hard and fast, but provides a useful organizational guide line.

How does the Amateur Radio volunteer fit into the Incident Command System? We are expected to be communicators, and within the ICS, this would place us in the Logistics Section in the Service Branch as part of the Communications Unit. The communications unit provides all communications services for the operation.

 

PRINCIPLES OF DISASTER COMMUNICATION:

1. Keep the interference level down. In a disaster, crucial stations may be weak. All other stations should remain silent unless they are called upon. If you're not sure you should transmit, don’t.

2. Authenticate all messages. Every message which purports to be of an official nature should be written and signed. Whenever possible, amateurs should avoid initiating disaster or emergency traffic themselves. We do the communicating; the agency officials we serve supply the content of the communications.

3. Don’t “broadcast.” Some stations in an emergency situation have a tendency to emulate “broadcast” techniques. While it is true that the general public may be listening, our transmissions are not and should not be made for that purpose.

10. DO NOT EVER BROADCAST the names of people who are injured or deceased.

 

ARRL MESSAGE PRECEDENCES:

EMERGENCY: Spell the word EMERGENCY out completely. Any message having life and death urgency to any person or group of persons, which is transmitted by Amateur Radio in the absence of regular commercial facilities. When in doubt, do not use this designation.

PRIORITY: Use abbreviation P. This classification is for important messages having a specific time limit, official messages not covered in the emergency category, press dispatches and emergency related traffic not of the utmost urgency.

WELFARE: Use abbreviation W. This refers to either an inquiry as to the health and welfare of an individual in the disaster area or an advisory from the disaster area that indicates all is well. Welfare traffic is handled only after all emergency and priority traffic is cleared.

ROUTINE: Most traffic in normal times will bear this designation. In disaster situations, traffic labeled Routine should be handled last, or not at all when circuits are busy with higher-precedence traffic .

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT WHEN YOU ARE PASSING MESSAGE TRAFFIC SOME ONE ON THE OTHER END MUST WRITE IT DOWN EXACTLY AS YOU GIVE IT. SPEAK SLOWLY AND PAUSE ABOUT EVERY 5 WORDS TO INSURE THE RECEIVING STATION IS COPYING YOUR MESSAGE EXACTLY. WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED WITH THE MESSAGE SAY END OF

MESSAGE AND THEN BE QUIET. THE RECEIVING STATION WILL FINISH WRITING THE MESSAGE DOWN AND THEN WILL READ IT BACK TO YOU TO INSURE IT WAS COPIED EXACTLY AS SENT.

Giving information Think before keying the mike, and then say the fewest number of syllables that will get the information across. The biggest problem with many ham operational nets is verbosity of transmission. Verbosity is great on rag-chew nets, because that is what you are there for. But on an operations net it should be pruned as much as possible. . For example, if you want to take a restroom break, just say “I’ll be off the air for 5 minutes”. This is better than giving a lengthy discourse about how long it’s been since you had been to a restroom and so on. Another good example would be for a rest stop operator to say “The Shelter is asking for more cots if they are available” rather than a long explanation about how many cots they have now and how there has just been a flood of new arrivals in the past few minutes. Always make it short, and transfer only the information that the other station needs to be able to fulfill the request.

Ham Radio Jargon: Let’s leave as much of this as possible out altogether. Q signals such as QSL, QSY, etc, are bad news for operational nets. Say “copy”, “switching to tactical”, “location”, “clear”, “off the air” and so on. The same restriction applies to use of 10 codes, but I probably don’t have to mention that, because most hams stay away from these anyway.

 

Amateur Call Signs:

We are all proud of our calls, and when we are working the bands we let our call signs announce to the world who we are. However, for net communications your call sign serves no purpose other than to meet your legal requirement to identify. So please don’t clutter the net with 10 or 15 syllables of call sign as part of your identifier or at the end of every transmission. If you are pretty sure that you are finished talking for a while, then give your call sign at the end. But if you think from the context of the conversation that you will likely be talking again in just a few minutes, then leave your call out for now, and give it later when you are done. It doesn’t matter if you miss your opportunity to identify and Control starts talking with someone else. You can just wait for a lull in traffic and just say “K6AAA ID”. Everyone will know that you are just IDing because you didn’t get an opportunity to do so before.

 

Breaking in to a conversation vs. the term “Break:”

“Break” when said by Control during a transmission means “I’m still continuing to talk, but I am switching the station that I am talking to, so everyone please listen up to hear if I am now calling you.” If you want to break into a conversation just interject during the repeater pause with your identifier, or tactical call.

For an emergency break,

“Emergency Traffic” is the shortest way to get the point across.

(END PART ONE)

 

NTS TRAINING

(PART TWO)

A message is considered a “formal” radiogram when it is completed with a correctly formatted preamble, address, text and signature. Stations in the system are not obligated to handle incomplete or improperly formatted messages.

 

This lesson is designed to present the message format and how to fill out the message form. The ARRL standard message consists of four main parts:
1. PREAMBLE: Information to track the message;
2. ADDRESS: Name and address of the intended recipient;
3. TEXT: The message information.
4. SIGNATURE: The party for whom the message was originated;

 

RECORDS: These four parts of the ARRL standard Radiogram are recorded information about how the message was originated, received, sent or delivered. Experienced traffic handlers can write and handle messages on plain paper, five or ten to a page. Get to know the format well enough to be able to do likewise.

 

 PREAMBLE PART:

All messages must have a preamble. The preamble of the message contains information about the message necessary to keep track of it as it passes through the amateur system.

Preamble information is also used to service undeliverable messages and to generate replies to specific handling instructions.

 

MESSAGE NUMBER:

The message number is selected by the station originating the message and it must be on all messages. It stays with the message all the way to the point of delivery. The delivering station may need to reply to the station of origin and refer to this number.

Use number digits only, no letters, leading zeros, or dashes

 

 PRECEDENCES of the Radiogram:
EMERGENCY (Always spelled out on form.):
Any message having life and death urgency to any person or group of persons, which is transmitted by Amateur Radio in the absence of regular commercial facilities. During normal times, it will be very rare. (When in doubt, do not use this precedence.)

 

PRIORITY (P):
Use abbreviation P. This classification is for all important messages having a specific time limit, official messages not covered in the emergency category, press dispatches and emergency related traffic not of the utmost urgency, notice of death or injury in a disaster area and personal or official types of traffic.

 

WELFARE (W):
This classification, abbreviated as W, refers to either an inquiry as to the health and welfare of an individual in the disaster area or an advisory from the disaster area that indicates all is well. Welfare traffic is handled only after all emergency and priority traffic is cleared.

ROUTINE (R):
Most traffic in normal times will bear this designation. In disaster situations, traffic labeled Routine should be handled last, or not at all when circuits are busy with higher precedence traffic.

 

 

 

HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS:
(OPTIONAL)

 

HXA__

(Followed by number.) Collect landline delivery authorized by addressee within [....] miles, (If no number, authorization is unlimited.).

HXB__

(Followed by number.) Cancel message if not delivered within [....] hours of filing time; service originating station.

HXC

Report date and time of delivery of the message back to the originating station.

HXD

Report to originating station the identity of station from which received, plus date and time. Report identity of station to which relayed, plus date and time, or if delivered, report date and time and method of delivery (by service message).

HXE

Delivering station get reply from addressee, originate message back.

HXF__

(Followed by a number.) Hold delivery until [date].

HXG

Delivery by mail or landline toll call not required. If toll call or other expense involved, cancel message and send service message back to originating station.

 

 

  STATION OF ORIGIN:

The call sign of the amateur station originating (creating) the message for first introduction into the amateur system is the station of origin and must be on all messages. This call sign must stay with the message to the point of delivery. (Service messages go to this station.)

 

 CHECK, CK:

The check is the number of word “groups” in the text of the message and must be used on all messages.  The CHECK includes any “periods” (written and spoken as X-Ray). The preamble, address and signature are not included. This number is used by operators to verify that the text has been copied with the correct number of groups. If the message was copied correctly and an error in the text exists, do not replace the old count with the new one. Instead, update the count by adding a ‘slash” followed by the new count.

If a discrepancy is found between the check and the word count of a message by relaying stations, every attempt should be made to verify that the correct text and check has been transmitted and received. This is your responsibility as an operator.

THE TEXT OR CHECK IS NOT ALTERED TO FORCE AGREEMENT!

 

 PLACE OF ORIGIN:

The PLACE OF ORIGIN is the City and State of the party for whom the message is created, not necessarily the location of the station of origin.

 Note that no punctuation’s are used.

 

  TIME FILED, [TIME], OPTIONAL:

The OPTIONAL “TIME FILED” is used only when filing time has some importance relative to the precedence, handling instructions, or meaning in the text. TIME FILED is the time when the message is created by the station of origin. The time figures are in the 24-hour format followed by the letter “Z” to denote UTC time, or local time, as in “0215Z” or “2215EDT”. It is acceptable to specify local time as “L”, as in 2215L.

The TIME FILED is normally omitted on routine traffic having no special time concerns. If used, the filing time must stay with the message to the point of delivery.

 

 MONTH FILED:

Month must be used on all messages. (If TIME FILED is used, this date must agree with that time); this entry is the month in which the message is created and is written in the preamble as the three letter abbreviation: The month/day is assumed to be UTC unless marked otherwise by a time. The abbreviations:
JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN, JUL, AUG, SEP, OCT, NOV, DEC
.

 

 DAY FILED:

The DAY FILED is the day of the month on which the message was originated and must be used on all messages. (If TIME FILED is used, the date and time must agree). The day is written in figures only, no leading zeros. On voice, two digit days are spoken as two separate digits (“one seven” rather than “seventeen”, etc.). The month/day is assumed to be UTC unless marked otherwise by a time.

End Part Two

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION SENDING MESSAGES ON VOICE

(PART THREE)

NTS TRAINING

 

This lesson will present the basics of transmitting the message on voice, and will include:
(
1) Tools used in transmitting the message.
(2) Rules for voicing the different parts of the message.
(3) Voicing the message exchange with examples, fills.
(4) Booking and sending multiple messages.
(5) Station Operations.

 

On voice we are faced with number different situations. We must say words to induce correct copy, and are forced to deal with language perceptions. The tools and rules that will be presented this evening tend to minimize the variability caused by those situations and will lead to accurate message transmissions. With a little practice these will become second nature to you.

Use of the following methods as uniform as possible will help assure both efficient and accurate traffic handling and net operations. If you use these techniques you will be understood anywhere in the NTS.

 

TOOLS

 

 PHONETIC ALPHABET:

All operators should memorize the phonetic alphabet and number pronunciation, and be fluent in spelling groups of words using phonetics.

 

A

ALFA

M

MIKE

Y

YANKEE

B

BRAVO

N

NOVEMBER

Z

ZULU

C

CHARLIE

O

OSCAR

1

ONE

D

DELTA

P

PAPA (PA-PA')

2

TWO

E

ECHO

Q

QUEBEC (KAY-BEK')

3

THREE (TREE)

F

FOXTROT

R

ROMEO

4

FOUR

G

GOLF

S

SIERRA

5

FIVE (FIFE)

H

HOTEL

T

TANGO

6

SIX

I

INDIA

U

UNIFORM

7

SEVEN

J

JULIETT

V

VICTOR

8

EIGHT

K

KILO

W

WHISKEY

9

NINE (NINER)

L

LIMA

X

X-RAY

0

ZERO

 

 PAUSES:

Pauses are crucially important tools in voicing messages. Pauses exist between words, letters and groups for clarity and separation, at the end of the Preamble, after each line of an address, the mandatory listening pause after the first BREAK, and even after every five lines of Text. The receiving operator hears pauses as clues to what is coming next in addition to aiding in correct group copying. Use pauses, they're free.

 

 PROWORDS, OPERATIONAL WORDS:

These words are spoken to begin or end the message, indicate information for the receiving operator, or to separate parts of the message or books. They are not written in the message or counted in the check. They are usually spoken in a different tone of voice to distinguish them from written parts of the message. The list follows.

 

 NUMBER: (before message number or SVC)

The proword “number” begins message copy. It tells the operator to copy everything after hearing the word “number”.

 

END: (END OF MESSAGE)

The proword “end” signals the end of groups to be copied, in other words, the end of the written message.

In other words, written copy is begun with “number” and terminated with “end”.

 

 BREAK:

The proword “break” marks the start of the text, and “break” at the end of the text marks the start of the signature. 

 

 I SPELL:

Used to indicate you are going back to spell the group just voiced. It is used with ONE GROUP AT A TIME, and is said IMMEDIATELY after voicing the group, followed by either phonetic or letter spelling of the group.

 

 I SAY AGAIN, is used To REPEAT FOR CLARITY:

Say the group(s), then “I say again”, repeat the group(s), and then continue.

  OVER:

Indicates the end of your transmission and signals the receiving station to go ahead:
The “OVER” may be used between messages or after other transmissions whenever the transmitting station wishes to signal or force the other station to go ahead.

The “OVER” is useful in preventing two stations from transmitting at the same time. It is used effectively when the words of the transmission are not themselves a clear indication for the other station to “go ahead”. “Doubling” by two stations can result in much wasted time and copying errors.

 

 ROGER:

Receiving station acknowledgment of message(s) copied. It is not necessary to repeat message number(s) or other parts. (“MESSAGE(s) RECEIVED”, “BOOK OF (#) RECEIVED”, are in wide use. For the sake of brevity and efficiency ROGER is the preferred method. ROGER, meaning received-understood, implies all messages were received.)

Roger means “received and understood”. It does NOT mean “yes” or “affirmative”.

 

 

 “Q” SIGNALS ARE NOT USED OPERATIONALLY ON VOICE!!!!!!

  FIGURE(s):

Used to introduce a group of one or more numbers. Say “figure(s)”, and then voice the numbers one digit at a time, group pause, and go on to the next group

 

TELEPHONE FIGURES:

Used to introduce the telephone numbers in an address or signature when no zip code is present (thus forcing the receiving station to skip the zip to the telephone number line.

 

 INITIAL:

Used to introduce a single letter initial, phonetic pronunciation mandatory, as in the
initial in a proper name, John R Smith: “JOHN  initial ROMEO  SMITH”.

  AMATEUR CALL:

Used to introduce an amateur call sign in the Address, Text, or Signature, but not in the Preamble.

 

E-MAIL and INTERNET ADDRESSES:

The normal voicing of such addresses is to treat all the groups formatted in the address as individual groups using the previously described and phonetics as required.

These addresses may be introduced as “email address and/or internet address” when it is desired to avoid having to introduce every group within the address.

 

 “Q” signals are not used operationally on voice.

 

 SPELLING, PHONETIC or LETTER:

When voicing a group try to understand the perception of the group by the receiving operator. Although context sometimes helps in group perception, surprises in formatting often make it safer to treat each group individually when making the decision to spell. When there is any chance of misunderstanding or ambiguity you may spell the group. Voice the group, use the operational words “I spell” immediately, and then spell the group with letters or phonetics.

Over-use of phonetics is controversial, but the objective in traffic handling is absolute accuracy in copy

 

 WHEN THERE IS ANY DOUBT ABOUT CORRECT COPY, SPELL IT OUT!

 

 NO EXTRANEOUS WORDS:

Pro-words, Introductory Words, and Operational Words are set aside for special purposes and are recognized by traffic handlers. Any other words used are likely to cause confusion or be written down by the receiving operator.

The object is to have the receiving operator copy the message exactly as it is written on the sending copy. Avoid surprises. Treat the unusual with spelling or “I say again” for clarity.

 

  SENDING SPEED:

 SENDING AT THE PROPER SPEED FOR ACCURATE COPY IS THE HARDEST SKILL TO LEARN IN TRAFFIC HANDLING.                     (End Part Three)

SENDING MESSAGES ON VOICE

Part Four- NTS Training

 

Amateur radio operators handling traffic have an ethical obligation to consider every message a “ball in play” until it is relayed, delivered, or serviced. Each station handling a message represents the entire amateur community. The objective of traffic handlers is to be like a fax machine in the chain of message relaying. Whatever goes in should come out the other end with reliability, accuracy, and promptness. The skills of both the transmitting and receiving stations in exchanging formal written messages involves speech perception and spelling problems unique to voice operating. The skills do require some practice. Unlike casual note taking, copy of the formal radiogram must produce the result of having every group transcribed exactly as it was written on the original message.

Sending messages for officials during disasters often puts the operator between the public and help. Getting the job done right is critical to public safety and welfare.
 

SENDING SPEED:

The transmitting operator must send clearly and at a speed which will allow the receiving operator to copy perfectly without rushing. Transmit, do not “read”, the message. This is one of the hardest skills in traffic handling to master. Use pauses to frame groups clearly.

 

Assume the receiving operator is copying with pencil and paper unless advised otherwise.

A useful trick to overcome the natural tendency to speak too rapidly is to say a group or phrase, pause, spell it to yourself as though you were writing it, and continue when you visualize that the receiving operator is also finished.

It always takes less time to send a message correctly the first time than it takes to negotiate repeats and fills of missing or uncertain parts. The importance of clearly spaced group sending can not be overemphasized.

 

Two stations passing traffic on voice seldom have the luxury of duplex operation like they have on the telephone. They must work together using the skills that come from proper training and experience to know what each other is doing. The art of “transmitting” a message is knowing when you are doing it right, and knowing the other person is following along in step, when you are transmitting in the blind.

 

 

 PAUSING FOR INTERRUPTIONS:

The receiving station should only interrupt for fills at those specific “break” points where listening pauses are mandatory unless it is known that the sending station is able to hear between groups, otherwise parts of the message may be missed. The receiving operator must develop certain skills and disciplines to assure accurate copy and efficient operation. These skills are complimentary to those involved in transmitting messages on voice.

 

 

TRANSCRIBE THE MESSAGE WITHOUT MODIFICATION:

No part of the message may be altered, even when it appears necessary, except for appending corrections to the check value. If part of a message appears to be in error, confirm the part with the sending station. If it is correctly received, leave it alone. You never really know what the message originator had in mind!

 

BE SURE OF EVERY GROUP RECEIVED:

Do not assume that you have copied a group correctly. If you miss part of a group avoid guessing about the missing part. Check each group to see that it fits the context and makes sense. If the sending speed is too fast, ask for reduced speed. If interference is present, ask for a shift in frequency if possible. Ask for a repeat or confirmation if you have any doubt. Only you know for sure that you have copied every group with certainty. Do not acknowledge the message until you are certain you have it copied it completely and accurately. Take the time!

 

ASK FOR FILLS OR CONFIRMATION:

If interference or static is present, or you make a copying mistake, mark the groups or parts of words which might be in error (underline). If the sending station is “listening between groups” interrupt with the group or segment. The sender will repeat. Otherwise, mark (underline, circle, etc.) groups you are not sure about as you go along. You can ask for “fills” formally after the “break” at the start of the text or at the end of the message. Read the message to check for questionable context. Ask for “fills” or confirmation until you are certain that you have the entire message correctly copied. Acknowledge the message only after this process is completed. Do not worry about taking the extra time. Other operators will respect your care.

 

ACCEPT ONLY MESSAGES YOU CAN RELAY OR DELIVER:

Try to accept only those messages you can forward or deliver in a timely fashion. Sometimes you may be asked to do otherwise as a liaison station or for “store and forward”.

If you accept a message, and are unable to pass it on promptly, try to find another station to accept it and keep it moving. There are many ways to move a message along. Phone a fellow amateur to take custody if you can not handle it properly. Mailing, personal delivery, telephoning neighbors of the addressee, etc., are alternative methods to direct telephone delivery. Ask fellow amateurs for help if you have difficulties. Messages should be delivered within 48 hours if possible.

 

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR MESSAGES ACCEPTED:

Once you acknowledge a message, it is your message to handle. Do not go back to the station from which you received it and bother him with delivery problems or change your mind about accepting it, however, it is reasonable, in some circumstances, to find the station from which the message was received and confirm the message content, but it is your responsibility, not his, to service the message.

 

EMERGENCY MESSAGES:

Emergency messages should be handled by the fastest path available, on or off radio. Notices regarding death or serious illness are often better delivered by relief agencies or public safety officials unless you have had the proper training and feel comfortable handling this type of message.

 

HONOR ALL HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS:

HX codes regarding delivery, progress and replies are part of the job. Failure to honor these requests is as serious as not delivering the message at all. If a reply is requested by HXE from the addressee, and no reply is forthcoming, send a service message back and say so. In these type messages, the "ball is in play" until the originating station receives his expected response. An “ARL SEVEN” reply request in the text is an option for the addressee to approve.

 

 DO NOT ORIGINATE MESSAGES WITHOUT PERMISSION: (There are legalities involved)

Originating a message for a third party (Someone other than yourself.) without permission is a fraud and forgery. (Strong words!) Generating messages about a third party or their property or status without their permission is also considered very poor practice. Respect privacy.

DO NOT service back changes of addresses, phone numbers, or other personal information about the addressee without their permission. The original message might be intended to pry into the private affairs of the recipient.

 

MAKE NO COMMENTS REGARDING MESSAGE CONTENT:

It is not proper to comment on the content of a message on the air, (legality excepted), or allow such a judgment to affect how a legal message is handled. The originator and the addressee deal with the content of messages. Any legal message placed in play in the traffic system should get the same good service. Even an apparently pointless message is at least giving the system some practice, and it is improper to assume that the message is pointless to the originator or addressee.

 

ACCEPT ONLY MESSAGES WHICH MEET FCC RULES:

Accept only messages in which content and purpose comply with the FCC regulations in force regarding third party traffic, the prohibition of "business" traffic, encryption, and other rules regarding prohibited communications.

 

It is difficult to examine a message and conclude with certainty what purpose or meaning is in the content in all cases. If in doubt, it is not mandatory to accept the message---refuse it. If you know by some other means than content that a message is business related, or otherwise illegal, do not handle it. If you wind up with such a message, and do not wish to send it along, send a service message to the originating station. You are the licensee held responsible by the FCC. Handling messages is a voluntary service.

 

End part Four

 

 

RADIOGRAM

Number

Precedence

HX

Station. of Origin

Check

Place of Origin

Time

Date

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To:

 

Address

 

 

 

City

 

State

 

Zip

 

Telephone

(           )

BREAK FOR TEXT

01

02                                                              

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

BREAK FOR SIGNATURE

Signature

 

Title:

 

Rec’d from

 

Date

 

Time

 

Net

 

Sent / Del.

 

Date

 

Time

 

Net

 

Moved

 

Counted

 

Reported

 

Completed